Mardi Gras Is Getting Close And We Have Just What You’ll Need! Plus Fun Facts About This Festive Holiday!

Mardi Gras is just around the corner and we have everything but King Cake to make this holiday as much fun as possible! We have beads galore, masks, boas, costumes, glasses, glitter and much, much more, you will just have to come in and see for yourself! Plus keep scrolling because there will be some interesting and fun facts about this wacky holiday!

ZANZIBAR MARDI GRAS EYE MASK

ZANZIBAR MARDI GRAS EYE MASK

 

CHANDELLE MARDI GRAS BOA

CHANDELLE MARDI GRAS BOA

 

MARDI GRAS JESTER SUNGLASSES

MARDI GRAS JESTER SUNGLASSES

Mardi Gras means ‘Fat Tuesday’ in French. Mardi Gras dates back thousands of years to pagan spring and fertility rites. Also known as Carnival, it is celebrated in many countries around the world, mostly those with big Roman Catholic populations, on the day before the religious season of Lent begins.Brazil, Venice and New Orleans have some of the holiday’s most famous festivities, bringing thousands of tourists every year.

When Christianity arrived in Rome, religious leaders decided to link these popular local traditions into the new faith, an easier undertaking than removing them altogether. The result? The exuberance and indulgence of the Mardi Gras season became a prelude to Lent, the 40 days of penance between Ash Wednesday and Easter Sunday.Along with Christianity, Mardi Gras spread from Rome to other European countries, including France, Germany, Spain and England.

It is believed that the first American Mardi Gras took place on March 3, 1699, when the French explorers Iberville and Bienville landed in what is now Louisiana just south of the holiday’s future command post: New Orleans. They held a small jubilee and named the spot Point du Mardi Gras. In the decades that followed, New Orleans and other French settlements began distinguishing the holiday with street parties, masked balls and opulent dinners. When the Spanish took control of New Orleans, they abolished these uproarious rituals, and the restrictions remained in force until Louisiana became a U.S. state in 1812.

On Mardi Gras in 1827, a group of students dressed in colorful costumes and danced through the streets of New Orleans, mimicking the festivities they’d seen while visiting Paris. Ten years later, the first recorded New Orleans Mardi Gras parade took place, a tradition that continues to this day. In 1857, a secret society of New Orleans called the Mistick Krewe of Comus organized a torch-lit Mardi Gras parade with marching bands and rolling floats, setting the tone for future public festivities in the city. Since then, krewes have remained a fixture of the Carnival scene throughout Louisiana. Other lasting customs include throwing beads and other trinkets, wearing masks, decorating floats and eating King Cake.

Mardi Gras Float

King cakes started in Europe as a celebratory food of the Feast of Epiphany  or Twelfth Night  Celebration. The cakes represented the three kings who traveled to celebrate Christ’s birth and often had a bean or trinket inside that represented the Christ child. King cake parties became a festive tradition in Western Europe during the 17th century. Settlers from France and Spain brought the King Cake tradition to the Southeastern United States where it is still very popular today. King Cakes are now more closely associated with Mardi Gras although the King Cake season goes from just after Christmas through Mardi Gras. Today it is customary to put a plastic baby inside the cake. Whoever finds the plastic baby inside their piece of cake gets to be the one to host the next party and purchase the next King Cake.
KingCake

Make sure you come in and see all the festive trinkets that we have to make this holiday one to remember!

 

 

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Posted in Costumes, Holidays, Merchandise